Pass the Buck Mountain

Author: Kirsten K., Wellness

My dog is a rescue who’d already had an unfortunate name for three years when he came to live with me, so rather than change it, I simply began referring to him as “The Beast.” Of all the animal companions I’ve had in my life, he is the sweetest, the most loving…and the most undisciplined. He also has a thick coat of fur that gets on EVERYTHING* and creates a private playground for parasites like fleas and ticks.

Parasites may not seem like a swoon-worthy topic, but neither is waking up from a night of spooning with your pooch to find itchy bites running the length of your body. Rather than pass the buck—and the bucks—to a groomer for regular flea dips, or use toxic flea and tick medications that can have harmful side effects, I reach for the Buck Mountain Parasite Dust.

I came across this product in the office of a naturopathic vet where I used to take another one of my dogs. Unfortunately, that dog had a particular sensitivity to flea bites, and even the doctor acknowledged that natural products weren’t strong enough to treat him. But when I got The Beast and flea season arrived, I decided to see what happened once this dust had settled.

The powder has only three ingredients: organic neem (a natural insecticide), yarrow (a natural insect repellent), and diatom flour (a natural dessicant). When sprinkled from head to tail along your pet’s spine, then brushed against the direction of hair growth, the powder comes in contact with the skin and finds those critters where they crawl.

Pest-free and spoon-worthy.

Whenever The Beast starts scratching, I start sprinkling. Applying the powder and brushing it into your animal’s fur provides some nice mommy-and-me time, and you don’t have to worry about it harming either of you or the environment. The powder has a pleasant herbal smell and can be used on windowsills, thresholds, and your pet’s bedding to discourage infestations in the home.

I have read mixed reviews about this product online, so it might not work for every animal or situation, but each time I powder The Beast, the fleas take a powder. Brushing it in about once a week seems to do the trick.

Flea and tick season is well underway, so if you have pets and don’t want to contend with pests, pass on those harsh chemical treatments and pass the Buck Mountain instead.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Buck Mountain Parasite Dust

 

Buck Mountain Parasite Dust can be purchased from The Pet Health & Nutrition Center, Carol’s Pet Cafe, and a variety of other online retailers. It can also be found at many holistic veterinary centers and natural pet supply stores.

 

*In the Ken Burns documentary The Dust Bowl, one woman who was interviewed said:

“My mother was very clean…She would take all her curtains down one day and wash them and hang them back up. A dirt storm would come in that night, and they would be just like they were before she washed them. That went on day after day after day. And once in a while, you would hear of some woman that just couldn’t take it anymore and she’d commit suicide.”

The Beast’s hair is my Dust Bowl.

 

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2 thoughts on “Pass the Buck Mountain

  1. Your Golden Retriever is such a beautiful boy! This powder sounds much healthier than the harsh chemical flea and tick medications on the market. Most vets sell these. They made my little poodle very sick. This information may help many little pets.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Toni! And you’re right about those flea and tick meds. There are warnings on the packaging that caution you not to get the product on your own skin, so I used to wear gloves when applying it to my other dog. I remember thinking, “If this is so toxic that I have to wear gloves, what is it doing to my dog?” I’m so glad that The Beast responds well to Buck Mountain Parasite Dust.

      Like

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