Taking the Waters

Author: Kirsten K., Beauty, Cold Drinks, Food, Food & Drink, Fragrance, Savories, Sweets, Wellness

Here in Southern California, we’re on the tail end of yet another summer heat wave. It feels like we’ve been pummeled with them this year, barely having time to enjoy a week of “cooler” temps (90s instead of 100s) before the next one rolls in. This latest wave brought some dreaded humidity that made going outside feel like stepping into a wet sauna. Ugh. We’re only midway through the season, so to keep my cool and freshen up when there’s no time for taking a bath, I’ve been taking the waters.

I discovered the culinary delights of rose water and orange blossom water when I got to know my Persian co-workers many years ago. They explained that Middle Eastern cooks use these floral waters in cooking and baking the way that most Americans use vanilla. I quickly learned that the waters also make fragrant and refreshing toners and tonics. During the summer, my favorite cooling trick is to pour them into spray bottles and keep them in the fridge for sweetly-scented spritzing throughout the day.

For years, I could only find Indo-European brand rose and orange blossom waters at Whole Foods and the ethnic foods aisle of some chain grocery stores, but then a large Middle Eastern market opened a few miles from my house and introduced me to a whole new world of culinary waters. There were familiar ingredients, like dillweed, cumin seed, and licorice, alongside less common ones, such as borage, sweetbriar, and willow, but some of the names were unrecognizable to me. What the heck is hedysarum? And fumitary water sounds like a treatment you’d be given on the road to wellville.

I bought them all.

Since I’m more of a baker than a cook, the dillweed and cumin have languished on a shelf, but orange blossom continues to be a favorite scent, and a rose by any other name—whether Naab or Ghamsar Kashan—smells as sweet. A whiff of willow holds hints of violet and rose, while fumitary emits the unexpected essence of peppermint. On sweltering summer nights, nothing beats a mist of mint water on sheets, pillows, and overheated skin, especially under the cooling currents of a fan.

Many of the descriptions online recommend taking these waters as a tonic beverage with plain water and sugar added. According to one, chicory water can “refine the blood,” promoting skin and liver health. Another claims that fenugreek water helps lower blood sugar and strengthen hair. Willow is said to stimulate the appetite, while fumitary (sometimes called fumitory) is beneficial for treating eczema and psoriasis. Hedysarum, which has a flavor completely unfamiliar to my American palate, tastes slightly medicinal, with a sharp earthiness and a trace of fruit that is both strange and exotic … and, apparently, useful for whooping cough.

In addition to Indo-European, I have found culinary waters from Cortas, Al Wadi, and Sadaf, but the largest selection is produced by Golchin. Most of them are only $3-5 a bottle, so stock up this summer and hydrate liberally, inside and out, because taking the waters is (almost) as therapeutic as a trip to the spa.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Culinary Waters

 

If you don’t live near a Middle Eastern market and can’t find these culinary waters at your local grocery store or gourmet food shop, many are available online from Persian Basket.

 

Turn to Mushrooms

Author: Kirsten K., Coffee, Food & Drink, Hot Drinks, Wellness

In a recent email to his subscribers, Tim Ferriss recommended the Superfood Mushroom Sampler Box from Four Sigmatic. Despite our sleep mask setback, I decided to order the box after reading about Tim’s experience with their mushroom coffee: “I was on FIRE for the entire day. I got more done that day than three or four days prior to that.” For a product that claims to deliver energy and focus with less than half the caffeine of regular coffee and none of the jitters, this was a ringing endorsement.

The “Finnish Funguys” at Four Sigmatic combine mushrooms, adaptogens, and superfoods to make earthy elixirs with nootropic properties. Translation: these plant-based brews can improve mental clarity, enhance memory, and increase productivity.* I was excited to try the samples, including two coffees, two hot cocoas, and four tea-like blends, but when I told Kirsti that I’d ordered mushroom coffee, her reaction was immediate and emphatic: “Yuck!” I thought she’d be intrigued, having just returned from a trip to Finland, where she found both the country and the people to be beautiful and charming, but she’s a coffee purist who was horrified at the thought of a fungus among us. Her too cool for toadstools attitude meant that I was on my own with this experiment.

Check out the effects of coffee #onshrooms.

I’d been expecting the mushroom coffee to taste just like java, but it had a slightly burnt flavor that wasn’t wholly unpleasant, although it wouldn’t pass muster with a coffee connoisseur. What I didn’t actually expect was the physical and mental boost I experienced during the day. I’d already been at work for hours flitting from project to project and talking a mile a minute before it occurred to me that this excellent new work ethic might simply be the effects of my morning joe. I stopped to check in with myself: no jitters or agitation, merely a feeling of energy and drive.

I waited a couple of days and tried the second packet of coffee. Again, I felt that increased and sustained energy as I went about my day. Since I’m not usually a strong placebo responder, I can only attribute the vroom to the ‘shroom. I’ve tried the hot cacao mixes (not sweet enough for me, but easily remedied) and the four elixirs, which tasted like bitter herbal tea. The addition of stevia leaf to Cordyceps, Lion’s Mane and Reishi softens the edge and imparts a light sweetness, but Chaga is best downed like a shot. To help make sense of its sampler, the company has compiled this handy guide, or enroll in their free Mushroom Academy.

The brew that started it all may be more “champignon of coffee” than champagne of coffee, but if you’re looking for a pick-me-up at work that won’t get you worked up, a comforting cup of Four Sigmatic will make you turn to mushrooms. So live like the Funguys and give these fungi a try.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Four Sigmatic Superfood Mushroom Sampler Box

 

As of this writing, the Superfood Mushroom Sampler Box is sold out, but Four Sigmatic products are available separately or in discounted bundles.

For a more in-depth review of Four Sigmatic and their mushroom coffee, visit Nootropedia.

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, so nobody’s minding the spore. Drink responsibly.

 

Mask in the Light

Author: Kirsten K., Wellness

“She was blind-ed by the light…”

My bedroom window faces east, and each year around the 1st of June my room lights up like the 4th of July. The angle and position of the rising sun cause laser-like beams of light to find their way through cracks in the blinds and directly onto my pillow. As readers of this blog know, I’m NOT a morning person, so this four-alarm fire at the crack of dawn is a rude awakening. There’s also a street light outside my window that, with its new energy-efficient LEDs, turns midnight into high noon. What’s a nyctophile to do?

I’ve considered and rejected blackout curtains for a number of reasons, so for years my solution has been to wear a sleep mask, but finding one that fits properly and meets all of my needs has proven more challenging than finding the perfect bra (men, you’ll have to trust me on this). Reviews have not been helpful, because people have different sleep habits and quirks when it comes to something covering their eyes. Tim Ferriss, who rarely steers me wrong, raved about a mask that I couldn’t manage to wear for a single night.

A night light is a no-no for quality sleep.

One feature I’ve discovered I MUST have in a sleep mask is eye cavities. You’ll never go back to a flat strip of material once you’ve worn a mask that allows you to open and close your eyes freely. The mask must also be soft, so it doesn’t cut into my skin, but sturdy enough to keep its shape and prevent any material from touching my lids or lashes. The strap needs to be snug, but not so tight that it gives me a headache. The Velcro should be adjustable, but the ends must meet neatly so that it doesn’t get caught in my hair. That’s a tall order, but I’m just getting started.

The primary purpose of a sleep mask is to block out light, and this is more important—and difficult—than you might think. While some people are sensitive and can be awakened by the barest light slipping in around the edges, deep sleepers can also be negatively affected by too much light. Scientists have found that even a typical night light can interfere with the body’s production of melatonin, a hormone that helps us fall and stay asleep. When you consider our exposure to artificial lights and computer, phone, and TV screens before bed and (often) during sleep, it’s amazing we aren’t all zombies (World War 💤). When I worked at an alternative healthcare center, one of the most common complaints among clients was insomnia. Maybe everyone just needed to cut the lights.

Eye cavities and a nose pad block out light.

I’ve always enjoyed nighttime, but I never experienced the bliss of sleeping in complete darkness until I found a sleep mask that blocked out ALL light. Unfortunately, I could only achieve this sightless sensation by lying perfectly still on my back, a position I can maintain for about ten minutes, tops. I move around a lot during the night and prefer to sleep on my side, so I need a mask that moves with me. Unless you attach it to your face with duct tape, however, even the best masks will let in some light when it comes to restless and/or side sleepers, but blocking out most—or even some—light is much better than nothing.

I have used and discarded several sleep masks over the years. Like many relationships, things usually start out great, but then you find something to complain about. I dallied with one that I really liked, but the cover started to fall apart after a couple of washes. Another was just right…until the foam began to disintegrate. I’ve been through straps that have lost their elasticity and others that have become hopelessly tangled in my hair. One mask pinched my nose, while another left crescent marks on my cheeks. I’ve slept with a bunch of losers trying to find The One, but I’ve gone steady with my current piece for almost a year and things are going well, so I’m finally ready to S.W.O.O.N. over it.

Escape™ into sleep with this luxury mask.

Dream Essentials sells a variety of sleep masks, from low cost to luxury, but while you might be tempted to try one of their aromatherapy, silk, or brightly patterned masks, I recommend the Escape™ Luxury Sleep Mask. With its contoured construction, plush material, adjustable strap, and eye cavities, it checks all the boxes. The mask was slightly stiff when I first started to use it, but became more flexible with repeated wear. Some light does sneak in when I’m not lying on my back, but I won’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Until Elon Musk turns his attention to creating sleep masks, I’ll continue to enjoy a Sleep Worthy Of One’s Nights with this essential accessory.

Since watching Sleepless in America and reading The Sleep Revolution, I’ve come to realize that getting quality sleep on a regular basis is one of the most important things we can do for our health and well-being, so be sure to slip on this luxury mask from Dream Essentials at bedtime and you’ll go out like a light.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Dream Essentials® Escape™ Luxury Sleep Mask

 

The Escape™ Luxury Sleep Mask is also available from Amazon.

 

This is my 100th individual post for The Swoon Society! It’s been a lot of work, so I think I’ll don my mask and celebrate by taking a nap. 😴

 

Take a Baobab

Author: Kirsten K., Food, Food & Drink, Hot Drinks, Wellness

I first encountered the baobab tree when reading The Little Prince in school. I assumed that the pesky plant with the funny name* on the volcanic asteroid was fictional, so I was surprised to learn later that it was a real tree on planet Earth. I can be forgiven for thinking that the baobab was made-up, though, because a) the name, and b) have you seen one? It actually looks like it’s from an alien world. I find it ironic that the tree is native to subtropical Madagascar, because it doesn’t provide much shade from the sun, unless you stand in the shadow of its massive trunk. It does, however, provide a fruit that’s been gaining buzz recently as a superfood.

While I believe eating a balanced diet is more important than fixating on so-called “super” foods, I also believe that vitamin supplements should come from whole food sources. The powdered fruit of the baobab tree is high in vitamin C, a potent antioxidant that promotes skin elasticity, strong bones, and vascular health by helping the body build and maintain connective tissue. Plus, no scurvy! Baobab fruit is also a good source of copper, iron, potassium, zinc, and fiber. The powder is tart and slightly sweet, so it mixes well in yogurt (I prefer the coconut milk yogurt alternative from So Delicious) and can be dissolved in warm or hot water with a little honey for a refreshingly sweet-and-sour sip.

While I could get my vitamin C by eating citrus fruits, it’s much more fun to supplement with baobab powder. I dare you to say the name without smiling. It’s exotic and tasty, and you don’t have to deal with seeds or pith (I have texture issues with most fruits and prefer to eat them in smoothie—or pie—form). Vitamin C has become synonymous with healthy immune function, so rather than take two pills and call your doctor in the morning, make the call to take two teaspoons of baobab in the morning and you’ll feel super all day.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Davidson’s Organic Baobab Powder

 

I discovered Davidson’s Baobab Powder while visiting their website to order more of my favorite rose tea, but there are other companies that sell organic baobab powder, including Baobest and Organic Burst.

 

*In my search for the proper pronunciation of baobab, I’ve come across equal instances of bow-bab (as in “take a bow”) and bay-o-bab. Since I’ve always pronounced it as bow-bab, I’m sticking with that.

In fairness, only six of the nine species of baobab trees are native to Madagascar, and only one—Adansonia grandidieri—has that distinctive, otherworldly look.

Standard disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This post is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

Hive Talkin’

Author: Kirsten K., Food, Food & Drink, Hot Drinks, Sweets, Tea, Wellness

Last weekend, I attended an event for Earth Day that included a presentation by The Valley Hive, a beekeeping outfit based in the northeast San Fernando Valley. They were invited to discuss the threat to honeybees and what’s being done to protect them—and, by extension, our food supply. This was serendipity, because I’d been wanting to learn more about The Valley Hive since visiting their kiosk at a local mall and tasting a “flight” of honeys.

Head beekeeper Keith Roberts led the presentation with an entertaining and informative talk about the tools and techniques used in beekeeping. He shared some surprising facts about honeybees, which are more fascinating than I’d imagined. Did you know that a hive functions as a pure democracy, with the bees making decisions by consensus that, scientists have discovered, are correct about 98% of the time? We could learn a lot from them about cooperation vs. competition.

But there IS some competition, which occurs when a queen dies or disappears from the hive. Sensing her absence, the bees will start feeding large amounts of royal jelly to a number of larvae. This high-protein substance causes the developing bees to transform into queens, which, upon hatching, will engage in a fight to the death until a single victor emerges. If one of the queens should hatch before the others, she will spear her remaining sisters in a Shakespearean act of mass regicide (and a few other -cides). Hamlet’s got nothing on the hive.

Despite the drama, this story has a sweet ending. The bees make and store honey for food, but produce much more than they actually need, so we humans can skim a little off the top without harming the hive. Honey is rich in antioxidants and never spoils. It has antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial properties and can speed the healing of wounds and burns. While I hear every spring about eating local honey to protect against seasonal allergies, Keith says the results of this practice have never exceeded the placebo effect in scientific studies (having recently read Suggestible You by Erik Vance, I’ve developed a healthy respect for the placebo effect).

Still, it’s always a good idea to support your friendly neighborhood beekeepers by purchasing local honey (defined as anything within 300 miles). Honey is naturally viscous, so large-scale producers must heat it above a certain temperature in order to fill assembly line bottles quickly, which destroys some of its beneficial properties. If your honey has a thin consistency or never crystallizes, it’s probably been subjected to high heat or “honey laundering,” so buy raw and local whenever possible.

Over the years, I’ve purchased many different varietals of honey, from alfalfa to tupelo, but I’d never had the opportunity to try several all at once until sampling the lineup from The Valley Hive. With just a taste of each, I was able to compare the nuances of avocado, buckwheat, orange blossom, sage, and wildflower honeys. It’s amazing to discover how different they are when experienced side-by-side. Sage and orange blossom, both light and extra sweet, are perfect for adding to hot or iced tea. Buckwheat is dark and strong, so it pairs well with pungent cheeses and imparts richness to barbecue sauce. Avocado was described to me as savory and has an almost buttery flavor, making it ideal for dressings and sauces. I bought a jar of wildflower honey for myself (because floral) and a jar of avocado for Kirsti, who likes to cook.

The best news we heard was that honeybee populations have been steadily rebounding over the past few years after the devastation caused by Colony Collapse Disorder. While CCD continues to be an issue, its causes are better understood today as beekeepers, scientists, and agribusiness work together to protect these vital contributors to the well-being and beauty of our ecosystem.

Small-scale beekeepers are usually passionate about the environment and the integrity of their honey, so remember that the “buzz” word is local. By supporting local beekeepers, you also support local agriculture and promote diversity, so get a bee in your bonnet to find a small-batch producer near you (or online), because when honeybees thrive, life is sweeter for everyone.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

The Valley Hive

 

 

Floral Dose

Author: Kirsten K., Cocktails, Cold Drinks, Drinks, Entertaining, Food & Drink, Recipes, Spirits, Wellness

This post is guaranteed to raise your spirits, because we’ve found the cure for the common cocktail. Readers of this blog know that Kirsti and I swoon over floral flavorings, so we almost slipped into a coma when we discovered this bouquet of botanical drink mixers from Floral Elixir Company. With flavors ranging from Orchid and Orange Blossom to Lemon Verbena and Lavender, these sweet syrups will breathe new life into your libations.

Floral Elixir Company handcrafts its line of 13 drink mixers using only natural herbs and flowers. This includes its rainbow of vibrant colors, which is created from a blend of botanicals. The syrups can be mixed with sparkling water to make singular sodas, or used to sweeten lemonade and iced tea. Behind the bar, these elixirs transform mixed drinks into magical potions with palliative properties.

Years ago, Kirsti hosted a cocktail party with a self-serve bar where guests could mix floral and herbal liqueurs (like St. Germain, Crème de Violette, and Canton) with sparkling wine. It was a huge hit, but these botanical syrups from Floral Elixir Company offer even more variety and control for amateur and master mixologists alike. Get started with these recipes and grow your repertoire.

Floral elixirs are the Rx for refreshment, so we prescribe an oral dose several times per day, or as needed, to restore well-being.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Floral Elixir Company Botanical Drink Mixers

 

In their online shop, Floral Elixir Company offers a Mini Elixir Master Set , which includes sample sizes of all their flavors, as well as cocktail kits for Champagne Lovers, Tea Lovers, and everything in between.

 

Sharing o’ the Green

Author: Kirsten K., Beauty, Tea, Wellness

What is it about mints and gum that prompts people to share? I can’t remember a time that I’ve been out with a group of friends when I haven’t had an open tin or pack offered to me. It’s like the universal gesture of amity and goodwill. In this spirit of generosity, I will share with you my sweet secret for healthy teeth, fresh breath, and a strong jaw: Green Tea Chewing Gum from Spry.

As I’ve written about before, I am a stickler for oral hygiene, but I’ve had my share of dental issues over the years. One hygienist I spoke with said she’s seen patients who are meticulous about brushing and flossing, but have new cavities with every visit, while others never floss and don’t brush regularly, yet enjoy a mouthful of flawless pearly whites. Genetics, diet, and lifestyle all play a factor, but you can tip the scales in your favor by chewing gum daily.

Not all gums are created equal, however. Some contain sugar and are little better than candy, while others are filled with artificial sweeteners like aspartame and sucralose. Spry uses xylitol, a naturally-derived sweetener that reduces cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect teeth and gums while neutralizing unpleasant odors.* I also find that Spry gum is slightly tougher than most other chewing gums I’ve tried, which is great for strengthening the teeth and jaw.

Beautiful on Raw gives a concise explanation for how thorough chewing can inhibit bone loss and increase density by applying stress to the teeth and jaw, which draws bone-building minerals to the area. It also increases the flow of calcium-and-phosphorus-rich saliva to help prevent tooth demineralization. I have a friend who is primarily interested in how chewing gum regularly can change the shape of one’s face, giving it a more attractive structure.† In any case, the practice is so easy and the benefits so numerous that it’s time to get busy chewing!

I like to chew gum for 5-10 minutes after I eat and 45 minutes to an hour on my nightly walk. I simply pop a piece in my mouth before I head out the door, then discard it when I return. This way, I get in a good amount of daily exercise without offending anyone by chewing in social situations.

But why green tea? Simply because it tastes great! Sugarless gums all seem to come in standard flavors of peppermint, spearmint, cinnamon, and fruit, but the Green Tea version from Spry has an almost floral note that is refreshingly unique. You won’t need mint to freshen your breath when xylitol is on the job.

This St. Patrick’s Day, instead of looking over a four-leaf clover, turn over a new leaf and start chewing on the idea of deliciously improving the health and beauty of your mouth and jaw with Spry Green Tea gum. Then pay it forward by sharing o’ the green.


Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Spry Green Tea Chewing Gum

 

Spry gum can be found at Whole Foods, Sprouts, and The Vitamin Shoppe, but many stores don’t stock the Green Tea flavor, so look for it online from Xlear and Amazon.

 

*Xylitol is extremely toxic to dogs and cats, so NEVER leave an open purse or container of xylitol-sweetened gum within reach of your pets.

†For this purpose, he recommends Falim gum, which is quite tough to chew. I tried it once and could definitely feel the stress on my teeth and jaw, but I didn’t enjoy the taste or the level of difficulty involved.

 

Essential Soil

Author: Kirsten K., Beauty, Fragrance, Wellness

terressentials-super-protection-deodorantYears ago, when I developed a sensitivity to deodorant, I tried virtually every brand on the market before finding one that actually worked and didn’t make my underarms feel like the pits. This miracle product was the Super Protection Deodorant from Terressentials, a small company dedicated to environmental responsibility and 100% natural and organic body care. I could devote an entire post to my regard for this roll-on were it not for the fact that underarm deodorant isn’t a particularly swoon-worthy topic. Fortunately, I discovered that Terressentials also makes an unconventional hair wash that functions as a Shampoo Worthy Of Our Notice.

Always on the lookout for simple, natural hair and skincare solutions, I jumped on the “no ’poo” bandwagon a few years ago, using a baking soda wash and apple cider vinegar rinse to clean and condition my hair. Apostrophe slang aside, I loved how this crack combo cleaned my scalp without weighing down my waves, but when I read several articles about the harsh effects of baking soda, I knew I had to find a fresh fix.

terressentials-lavender-garden-pure-earth-hair-washAfter trying several different products and conducting a few disastrous homemade experiments (turns out you have to SIFT the rye flour), I spied Terressentials’ Pure Earth Hair Wash while on a deodorant run at my local health food store. I’d seen this product before over the years, but had dismissed it as not suitable for my scalp, which tends toward oiliness. However, in the interest of research, I decided to try the sweetly-scented Lavender Garden.*

This wash takes some getting used to. Composed primarily of organic aloe vera and bentonite clay, it contains no soap or detergent and does not foam up. You must massage the mud-like paste into wet hair for 2-3 minutes to make sure it comes in contact with all parts of the scalp. It’s also recommended that you repeat this process the first few times you use it in order to thoroughly clean your hair.

terressentials-pure-earth-hair-washWhile it may seem like a paradox, washing with dirt actually works! Without harsh cleansers or heavy conditioners, my hair was squeaky clean and untangled with ease, while the essential oil fragrance surrounded me in scents of lush lavender, sweet orange, and rose geranium. Just a dab of unscented hair gel to tame frizz and flyaways and I was good to go.

When it comes to pure and natural hair care, sometimes you have to get your strands dirty, so dig up this essential soil and bring your shampoo down to earth.

S.W.O.O.N. Stamp
Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Terressentials Pure Earth Hair Wash

 

*It turns out that Lavender Garden is recommended for normal-to-dry hair, but it works well for my scalp.

Scentuary

Author: Kirsten K., Fragrance, Wellness

olo-violet-leather-perfume-1Kirsti’s recent post about Jasmin et Cigarette perfume prompted recollections of the time she introduced me to a similarly surprising combination of scents, which has played an unexpected role in my life ever since.

Several years ago, I was struggling with some personal issues in the weeks leading up to my birthday and had fallen into depression. Kirsti and her husband Aaron, unaware of my distress, had arranged to take me out to dinner on my birthday. I was not in a mood to celebrate and secretly hoped for an excuse to get out of it, but none presented itself, so I resolved to get on with it.

I arrived at the restaurant to find that Kirsti and Aaron were already seated with a bottle of champagne on ice. They greeted me enthusiastically and had the server fill our glasses to toast the occasion. Over a delicious meal, we shared stories and camaraderie in a cozy, candlelit setting.

After we’d eaten, Kirsti produced gift bags and a beribboned black hatbox filled with presents, including a small bottle of Violet/Leather fragrance from OLO. Perpetually on the lookout for all things violet, she’d come across this blend by perfumer Heather Sielaff in Portland, Oregon, and thought it was curious enough to warrant purchasing a bottle, scent unsmelled.

olo-violet-leather-perfume-2I dabbed the perfume on my wrist and breathed it in. The violet was there, softly lingering around the edges, but the leather was front and center. Having been a vegetarian for more than 20 years, it was not the type of scent I would have chosen for myself, but it suited me at that time. Clean and straightforward, it was both edgy and old-fashioned without a trace of cloying sweetness. I kept returning my nose to my wrist to see how the fragrance evolved.

As I sat there enveloped in violet and leather, I observed diners enjoying their food and each other’s company. There was a tangible sense of fellowship in the dimly lit room. Sated with dinner, pleasantly relaxed from the wine, and basking in the warmth of good friends, I felt a profound shift occur within me. Suddenly, I thought, “You are loved. Life is beautiful. All is well.” And like that, the mood that had been dogging me for weeks dissolved completely.

Studies have shown that scent triggers memories and emotions more than any other sense, so whenever I find myself going through a rough patch, I reach for my bottle of Violet/Leather perfume and inhale. The fragrance instantly transports me back to that birthday dinner and the feeling of absolute well-being I experienced.

While I can’t necessarily credit the perfumer with this transformation, OLO sells a number of intriguing scents with names like Victory Wolf, Dark Wave, and Lightning Paw that are worthy of a whiff. Perhaps one of them will turn out to be the special fragrance that becomes entwined with your own happy memories and creates a “scentuary” that you can return to whenever you need a reminder that all is well.

S.W.O.O.N. Stamp
Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

OLO Fragrances

 

Mother of Dragon’s Blood

Author: Kirsten K., Beauty, Wellness

Blood of the Dragon Styling GelAs I’ve mentioned before, I enjoy laziness. I usually shower at night, because I can go to bed with wet hair and it will be dry in the morning with no effort on my part. As I’ve also discussed, my hair is prone to frizziness…and frizziness + laziness = craziness. Fortunately, I’ve found a Method for solving this equation.

I could write individual posts for most of the items in the Morrocco Method line of hair care products (and I just might), but their Blood of the Dragon Styling Gel has been a workhorse for me this summer and deserves its moment in the sun. My hair dries quickly in the arid heat of Southern California, so I’ve been massaging a dollop of the gel into my wet hair and allowing it to dry naturally during the day. The Light/Medium hold of this non-greasy gel helps to define curls, smooth split ends, and bring out shine. While there’s nothing unusual about how it works—most hair gels can get the job done—there IS something unusual (and swoon-worthy) about the ingredients and the method by which it’s made.

Aloe Vera LeafOver the 50 years that Anthony Morrocco has been cutting and styling hair for celebrity clients, he’s learned that holistic care leads to beautiful hair. Dissatisfied with many so-called “natural” products on the market, he created his own pristine hair care line from pure plant botanicals and naturally-derived minerals. All MM products are synthetic-free, cruelty-free, gluten-free, sulfate-free, soy-free, Paleo, and raw. Blood of the Dragon Styling Gel is also wildcrafted and vegan (top that!). Made from a base of aloe vera and dragon’s blood powder, it has a neutral fragrance that won’t interfere with other scented products, washes out easily, and can be used with impunity, since it’s safe for you and the planet.

Targaryens and wild hair-ians agree: Blood of the Dragon is the mother of natural styling gels. So if you have an insane mane like me, apply some Method to your madness and take a summer vacation from bad hair days.

S.W.O.O.N. Stamp
Stuff Worthy Of Our Notice™ in this post:

Morrocco Method Blood of the Dragon Styling Gel